Suggested Releasing Species

Economic local fish species such as Green Grouper, Mangrove Snapper and Painted Sweetlip are suggested species for mercy release as to recover the previously deprived marine resources. Problem such as surge of biomass would not be a major concern as the fish tend to disperse from the releasing location very soon with the ocean currents. Therefore, releasing native species would be an environmentally conservative measure.

 

The following local fish species are suggested for mercy release:

P_野放_芝麻斑 Duskytail Grouper Body in light brown with dark-brown stripes and orange spot; inhabit coral reef, rocky reef and sandy area; mainly feed on small fish and invertebrates.
Giant Grouper Large reef fish; yellow on the body with irregular spots and black-patched fin; inhabit rocky reef, coral reef and estuary, occasionally found inside ship wreckage in bays; predominantly feed on crustacean and fish.
Hong Kong Grouper Brownish-gray body, red or orange-patched; black patches on the dorsum, rarely; inhabit coral reef; mainly feed on fish, crustacean and worm; nearly extinct due to overfishing, consumption should be avoided.
Orange-spotted Grouper Brown on the dorsum while white on the abdomen, 6 light-brown, diagonal strips and reddish orange spots on the body; inhabit rocky reef and sandy area; feed on fish and invertebrates.
Red Snapper Red/orange body, lighter on the abdomen; a wide and dark strip extending from the upper jaw to the root of dorsal fin; inhabit estuary and coral reef while juveniles usually occur at mangrove and seaweed bed; mainly feed on fish, squid and crustacean; common releasing species at artificial reef.
Mangrove Snapper Reddish brown on both sides of the body; 8 vertical strips on juvenile’s body and 1 to 2 blue strips through the cheeks of juveniles; inhabit coral reef and rocky reef; juveniles usually occur at estuary and mangrove; mainly feed on fish and crustacean.
Star Snapper Brown to purple on the upper part of the body and brownish yellow on the lower part, a small patch at the rear; inhabit rocky reef and coral reef; mainly feed on fish and crustacean.
Russell’s Snapper Brown on the upper part, silvery white on the lower part and the abdomen, a dark patch at the rear, yellow-finned except dorsal fin; inhabit coral reef and rocky reef; juveniles usually found at estuary, mangrove and seaweed bed; mainly feed on fish and crustacean.
Painted Sweetlip Yellow-spotted, bluish-gray body; inhabit coral reef, rocky reef, sandy area and artificial reef; mainly feed on benthonic invertebrates and fish.
Crescent Sweetlip Silvery gray body, 3 curving strips on the dorsum; dorsal fin, tail and the rear part of the body are black-patched; inhabit coral reef, rocky reef and sandy-muddy region; mainly feed on benthonic invertebrates and fish.
Yellow-fin Seabream Silvery body; yellow on pelvic fins, anal fin, tail and the lower part of the body; occurrence at shallow, coastal region, estuary and rocky reef; mainly prey on Echinoderm, worm and crustacean.
Spotted Scat Silvery body, brown abdomen and brown-spotted; brownish orange pattern found on juveniles’ eyes and back; spiky fins; inhabit in brackish water, lower course of a river and mangrove; feed on worm, insect, crustacean and plant.
Japanese Sea Bass Glittering, cyan body; black-spotted; white on the venter; inhabit in fresh water and estuary; occurrence at coastal rocky reef during breeding season in winter; feed on fish and shrimps.
Greater Amberjack Large fish, bluish gray on the dorsum and white on the venter; yellow-striped horizontally on the body; dark strips through the eyes diagonally; inhabit coral reef and rocky reef and sandy or muddy area nearby; predominantly prey on fish and invertebrates.
Snubnose Pompano Silver on the dorsum and white on the venter; yellow on the dorsal fin, pelvic fins, anal fin and the tail; inhabit coral reef, rocky reef and sandy and rocky area nearby, also found at muddy bay proximate to estuary; predominantly prey on shelled invertebrates.